Sunday, November 19, 2017

HomePizzaChef

Homemade Pizza Parlor – They'll Beg You To Make Another!

My Favorite Assorted Pizza Making Tips

Posted by Lock On October - 28 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

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My Favorite Pizza Making Tips!

Less Sugar allows longer baking time

Speeding up the dough Process – More Yeast equals less preparation time…

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450-465 degrees- normal crust

Thicker crust – 400-450 degrees…

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Pizza bone – Edges of crust are over cooked….
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Different methods of forming brings about different characteristics of the pizza crust.

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Hand Tossing / Hand Stretching – Good volume and randam distribution of the gases in the dough will create a more cake type dough.

Sheeting – Will degas the dough (air makes the dough rise) This will create a thiner more cracker type crust…

Pressing – Heated roller pins will help redistribute the gases in the dough.
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Crispier doughs are made by adding more water to the dough. Experiment with various amounts without lloosing h\the ability to handle the dough.

The extra moisture in the dough will allow heat to rise into the dough and create a heat barrier and cannot be passed into the sauce therefore the crust collects in the bottom of the dough thus making thedough bake crispier.
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The softer your dough the crispier your crust will be however the more firm your dough the thicker your crust.
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Line ingredients on the counter in the order of use.
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It’s The Cheese That Makes Our Mouths Water!

Posted by Lock On October - 26 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

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Let’s face it, one of the favorite ingredients of any pizza is the cheese.  It’s that hot and stringy cheese that separates pizza from all other foods. The moment you pull that slice from the pie and the hot stringy cheese stretches unto your plate, we all get excited about “what’s next”.

Let’s take a moment to look a little closer at this wonderful an essential ingredient of our beloved pie.
Most pizzas are made with mozzarella cheese. Though this may vary from time to time, mozzarella cheese is by far the favorite when constructing a delicious pizza.

What is mozzarella cheese? Where exactly does it come from? How is it made? Have you ever asked yourself these questions?

Mozzarella cheese is a sliceable curd cheese originating in Italy. That’s probably not a surprise to you. Traditional mozzarella is made from water buffalo (Ok, before your eyes get big, not the North American buffalo or bison as many people mistakenly think) milk, and its flavor is highly prized. Water buffalo milk is three times more expensive than cow’s milk and is costly to ship, so expect a corresponding high price tag on imported buffalo mozzarella.

These animals are typically only herded in a few select countries, primarily Italy and Bulgaria.  Due to this, most mozzarella as we know it, is now made from cow’s milk. Water buffalo milk is very high in fat and in many cases is not easily digestible in its raw form. As such, it is used exclusively for making mozzarella and not as a beverage.

Mozzarella contains 40 to 45 percent fat, although there are now lower fat, skim versions available as we’ve seen them make their way into the “low fat” pizza market space.

This type of mozzarella cheese is not aged like most cheeses and is actually best when eaten within hours of its making. The process of making mozzarella is called pasta filata, which means the curds are heated in water or whey until they form strings (hence the term “string cheese”) and become elastic in texture. The curds are stretched, kneaded until smooth, and then formed into round balls to make fresh mozzarella cheese.

Different Mozzarella Cheese Types – Fresh Mozzarella Varieties

Mozzarella is not aged and is best when eaten within hours of its making.

Most people are quite familiar with mozzarella cheese. It is the cheese traditionally used on pizzas and to make fried cheese sticks. It’s important to note, there is quite a difference in flavor and texture between fresh mozzarella and processed sliced or shredded mozzarella, and it’s well worth your time to understand the differences.

It is easy to make homemade mozzarella cheese, and it can be used in a variety of recipes, including salads, meats, poultry, seafood, and vegetables.

Fresh Mozzarella Cheese

Fresh mozzarella cheese balls are sold in a brine, whey or water solution which helps them retain hydration and shape. It is smooth, mild, and slightly sweet/sour with a distinct milk flavor. The texture is creamy and much softer than mass-processed mozzarella cheese forms that are familiar to most. True buffalo mozzarella is much superior to any made with cow’s milk and is highly sought throughout the world.

Small balls (typically about one inch in diameter) of fresh mozzarella marinated in plain or herbed olive oil are called boconccini. Smoked mozzarella is known as mozzarella affumicata. Manteca is fresh mozzarella molded around a piece of butter.

Mozzarella rolls can be found with fillings of olives, prosciutto, Parma ham, sun-dried tomatoes, and any variety of herbs. The simplest and most enjoyable way to eat fresh mozzarella is with sliced fresh tomatoes, basil leaves, and a drizzle of olive oil. You’ll see this dish in a variety of forms served in many authentic Italian restaurants.

Fresh mozzarella is in high demand across America. It can typically be found in most common commercial grocery stores and in some Italian markets. It’s a good idea to keep fresh mozzarella in its liquid bath until ready to eat, and eat. This will usually last 2 to 3 days. If you choose to purchase fresh mozzarella you should always check the product dating and buy the freshest cheese that you can find. It’s preferable to purchase cheese made the same day. It’s also important to note, fresh mozzarella becomes bitter and sour with age. Freezing this type of cheese is also not recommended.

Processed Mozzarella Cheese

Contrary to fresh mozzarella, mass-produced mozzarella cheese is dryer, less flavorful, and has a rubbery texture. This bears little resemblance to its fresh counterpart. It’s quite a firm cheese that melts easily, which makes it best used as a binder for sauces, for melted toppings, and in baked dishes like our beloved pizza pies. Processed mozzarella cheese is easily attainable in part skim, low-fat, and non-fat versions. It’s typically packaged in pre-sliced or shredded assortments. It’s a good idea to keep processed mozzarella cheese tightly wrapped. It can usually be used within 2 to 4 weeks, if you want it to retain its full flavor.

The next time you sink your teeth into your favorite pizza pie, remember it’s the cheese that makes our eyes widen and lips smack. “Oh my”, pizza, what a wonderful and delightful treat.

Secrets Of Making Great Pizza At Home

Posted by Lock On October - 22 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

secretsOccasionally aspiring “pizza chefs” decide to create their favorite pizza pies at home. Firstly, the home pizza maker proceeds to gather all necessary ingredients for the highly anticipate pie. Once all ingredients are carefully arranged on the kitchen counter, the pizza maker prepares to commence the master pizza creation process.

Emphasis is placed on selecting the “perfect” blend of cheese and toppings. Also the precise blend of ingredients for the savory pizza sauce is selected. Typically, all eyes are on the pizza pie as it evolves in the kitchen. Once the pie has been carefully crafted, it is placed on a “pizza pan” and the master pizza baker slides the pie into the oven. Yes, into the oven it goes!

Some 7-12 minutes later, the pizza pie is removed from the oven. The master home pizza maker grabs the pizza cutter…. only to find that the crust is “doughy”, soggy, somewhat soft and certainly not representative of the great tasting pizza crust that you hoped to create. This is not the mouth watering pizza crust that you remember from the pizza parlor. What happened? Where did you go wrong?

If this sounds familiar, today is your lucky day because we’re going to take a look at the factors associated with this type of pizza phenomenon.  There are 3 main factors that we need to examine with respect to making great pizza at home with respect to the pizza crust you desire…

1-    Dough Selection & Proofing
2-    Oven Temperature
3-    Moisture content

Let’s take a closer look at the factors that contribute to these critical elements of creating the perfect pizza crust.
Selection of Dough:

Background:

Back in Italy when pizza makers select dough classification system. Flour is classified b way of numbers. 1, 0, or 00, this refers to how finely ground the flour is and how much of the bran and germ have been removed from the final flour product.

To give you a better understanding of this, 00 flour is the most highly refined flour available and is comparable to talcum-powder. Most Italian 00 flour is made from Italian grains and sometimes blends of Italian and imported grains to achieve a range of protein somewhere in the 10–12.5% range.

Lucky for us, common brands of 00 flour can be found at the retail level in standard U.S. grocery stores. One such flour is a brand called King Arthur Flour, the company produces a “clone” of the 00 flour (some call it Italian-Style flour) with a protein level of approximately 8.5% which is somewhat lower than the imported Italian 00 flours. Though it’s not exactly an authentic Italian flour and can produce varied behavioral characteristics, it’s a good flour for baking pizza at home.

ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR:
This type of flour refers to flour with a protein level between 10-12%. All purpose flour is ideal for general baking purposes.

It’s important to note that higher protein flours make firmer, stronger doughs while lower protein flours produce softer, weaker doughs. Protein values differ as a cake flour is somewhere around 7-9% protein, whereas pastry, or cookies tend to hover around 9-10%. Bread typically yields 12.5-13.5% protein, whereas clear and high-gluten yield 14-15% protein and gluten “flour” (actually refined gluten) yields somewhere around 45%.

So why are we making such a “fuss” about flour type. Glad you asked! That leads me to another important factor with respect to making pizza crispy at home.

ABSORPTION:
As defined by many baking experts, absorption is simply a measurement that was established by flour producers to describe the capacity of a particular flour to absorb water and achieve a specific and desired dough consistency. The value is often times expressed in terms of percent of water absorbed by a flour sample during the measurement test. The measurement is a laboratory measurement. This is important to keep in mind because this value is not identical to what’s called the hydration ratio actually achieved in commercial applications at pizza parlors, though it is usually quite close.

(Excerpt from The Secrets Of Making Home Pizza)
Get the Full Report Here:
http://www.homepizzachef.com/pizza-bonanza/index.html

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Mushroom Turkey And Swiss Cheese Pizza

Posted by Lock On October - 20 - 2015 1 COMMENT

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What You’ll Need To Make Mushroom Turkey And Swiss Cheese Pizza Recipe Suggestion – Make your dough the night before you plan to bake your pizza, this will allow plenty of time for the dough to rise and also adds to the flavor of your crust)

Having problems making pizza dough? Take the pizza dough mini course… It’s FREE. You can find it here:
7 Secret Tips For Making Great Pizza Crust At Home

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History of Chicago Style Pizza

Posted by Lock On October - 18 - 2015 3 COMMENTS

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The Chicago-style “deep-dish” pizza that many people love was invented at Pizzeria Uno, in Chicago, in 1943, reportedly by Uno’s founder Ike Sewell, a former University of Texas football star. However, a 1956 article from the Chicago Daily News asserts that Uno’s original pizza chef Rudy Malnati developed the famous recipe.

The pizza’s foundation is simple. It uses a thick layer of dough (made with olive oil and cornmeal) that is formed to a deep round pan and pulled up the sides. The pizza crust is then parbaked before the toppings are added to give it greater spring.

Parbaking is a cooking technique in which a bread or dough product is partially baked and then rapidly frozen or cooled. The raw dough is baked as if normal, but halted at about 80% of the normal cooking time, when it is rapidly cooled and frozen. The partial cooking kills the yeast in the bread mixture, and sets the internal structure of the proteins and starches (the spongy texture of the bread), so that it is now essentially cooked inside, but not so far as to have generated “crust” or other externally desirable qualities that are difficult to preserve once fully cooked.

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How To Grill Your Favorite Pizza!

Posted by Lock On October - 10 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

America’s favorite food has long been the pizza cooked in a traditional oven but is that about to change? While most Americans have probably never indulged in a grilled pizza, the origins of pizza are making a big comeback. There is no denying that we love our traditional backyard barbeque but rarely, if ever has the barbeque included grilling a pizza. Despite the seemingly odd combination of grill and pizza, the grill is the ideal tool for cooking pizza and in fact is deep in the origin of pizza making. The high, dry heat is ideal for a nice crisp crust and the flavor provided from your grill will on a whole new world of backyard grilling.Before the word pizza was ever used, Greeks and Romans used wood-fired brick ovens to prepare the original version of pizza – flatbread. In ancient times each diner was given a piece of flat bread along with a piece of meat on the bread. This food was eaten with the fingers with an occasional knife to cut the meat. Little did they know that this would eventually spark the creation one of the America’s favorite foods.

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    Great Mediterranean Pita Pizza Recipe

    Posted by Lock On October - 8 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

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    Ingredients:
    * 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    * 1 medium onion, finely minced
    * 1/2 green bell pepper, small dice
    * 1 pound ground lamb (or turkey or chicken)
    * 1 teaspoon cumin
    * 1 teaspoon coriander
    * 4 sprigs fresh oregano
    * OR
    * 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
    * Salt and pepper
    * 2 tablespoons tomato paste
    * Water (optional)
    * 4 large fresh pita
    * 1/4 cup grated Parmesan
    * 4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled
    * 2 Roma tomatoes, seeds removed, small dice
    * 1/4 cup kalamata olives, roughly chopped
    * Olive oil (optional)
    * Fresh torn basil (optional)

     

    Directions:

    Preheat oven to 500F. (Note: If pita is fairly sturdy, place assembled pizzas
    directly on rack. If not, preheat a baking sheet with the oven.)
    In a large sauté pan, preheat oil and pan over medium flame. Add onions and
    peppers and sweet for about five minutes to soften.
    Add ground meat and more oil if necessary to prevent sticking. As meat browns,
    break up with a wooden spoon to combine with veggies and brown evenly

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    Butternut squash is also known in Australia as Butternut pumpkin, is a type of winter squash that is absolutely delicious.  It has a distinct sweet and nutty taste that is similar to that of pumpkin.  This type of yellow skin squash also boasts an orange fleshy pulp. When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer.

    The most popular variety, the Waltham Butternut, originated in Stow, Massachusetts, on what is now the Butternut Farm Golf Club. This makes a very unique ingredient for our next pizza creation which I’m sure you’ll absolutely love!

    Ingredients:

    * 1 1/2 pound butternut squash

    * 1 tablespoon vegetable oil

    * 1/2 cup water

    * 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and kept warm

    * 10 sheets phyllo stacked between sheets of wax paper and covered with a kitchen towel

    * 9 tablespoons parmesan cheese — freshly grated

    * 6 slices bacon cut into 1/2-inch pieces, cooked until crisp, and drained

    * 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves — minced

    * 6 scallion greens — chopped

    * 1 small red onion sliced thin and separated into pieces

    Directions:

    Quarter squash lengthwise and discard seeds. Peel squash carefully and cut into 3/4-inch pieces. In a large heavy skillet cook squash in oil over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes. Add water and salt to taste and simmer, covered, until squash is just tender, about 10 minutes. Simmer squash, uncovered, until almost all water is evaporated, about 5 minutes. In a food processor purée squash with salt and pepper to taste. Squash purée may be made 1 day ahead and chilled, covered.

    Preheat oven to 400°F.

    Lightly brush a large baking sheet with some butter and put 1 sheet phyllo on butter. Lightly brush phyllo with some remaining butter and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon Parmesan. Put another sheet of phyllo over cheese, pressing it firmly so that it adheres to bottom layer. Butter, sprinkle with cheese, and layer remaining phyllo in the same manner, ending with a sheet of phyllo. Lightly brush top sheet with remaining butter. Fold in all sides 1/4 inch, pressing to top sheet, and fold up a 1/4-inch border, crimping corners.

    Spread squash purée evenly on phyllo crust and top with bacon, rosemary, scallion greens, and onion.

    Bake pizza in middle of oven until crust is golden, about 15 minutes.

    Pizza – It’s Simply An American Favorite

    Posted by Lock On October - 4 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

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    Few American foods are loved more than the infamous “pizza pie”. It doesn’t matter if you’re young, old or somewhere in between, almost everyone has a favorite when it comes to pizza. It would be rare to find someone that has never tried a slice of pizza.

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    Perfect Pesto Pizza Recipe

    Posted by Lock On October - 2 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

    Today’s pizza is an Italian Favorite. It goes to the very heart of great Italian cooking. If you enjoy pesto you’ll love this pizza pie.

    “Pesto” the name itself comes from the Latin root “pestle,” which is typically fitting as the sauce, in its simplest form, its made by crushing a few key savory ingredients together. There are two forms of pesto sauce that are commonly used… pesto alla genovese and pesto alla siciliana. Both forms of pesto sauce are from Genoa and Sicily, respectively.

    Pesto alla genoese is made with garlic, salt, extra virgin olive oil, Pecorino Sardo cheese, and Genoese basil.  (Note that Genoese basil is just one member of the large basil family.) The recipe for pesto alla siciliana is similar, but with tomatoes and less basil. Most accept the fact that the Genoese recipe for pesto, was the original recipe.

    Pesto  sauces are typically made with a veriety of different ingredients and have been part of Italian cuisines since Roman times. In addition to the well known two basic pesto recipes, other variations include red bell peppers,  sun dried tomatoes, pine nuts, walnuts, parmesan cheese, and ricotta cheese. In fact, some pesto sauces are made with arugula instead of basil.

    Pesto is a very versatile sauce and can be used as a bruschetta topping, on pasta, on cooked meats, and even in soups. Of course today we’ll be using pesto sauce for our pizza. A lovely way to explore pesto sauces is to buy a few different kinds, and make a platter of pesto bruschetta using each sauce… then decide which sauce suits your fancy for your favorite pizza pie.

    By the way, most basil plants grow year after year and will increase in size if they are planted in nourishing soil.

    While the herb is delicious to eat fresh from the bush in salads or as a pasta topping, it can also be used delightfully in the form of a pesto sauce as you’ll see today.

    HomePizzaChef’s Premier Pesto Pizza

    • 1 1/2 cups (packed) stemmed spinach leaves
    • 1/2 cup (packed) fresh basil leaves (about 1 bunch)
    • 1 1/2 tablespoons oil from oil?packed sun?dried tomatoes or olive oil
    • 1 large garlic clove
    • Olive Oil (of course…)
    • Your favorite thin pizza crust recipe (see many crust recipes on this site)
    • 1/3 cup sliced drained oil?packed sun?dried tomatoes
    • 2 cups grated mozzarella cheese (about 8 ounces)
    • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese

    Alternative Pesto Recipe

    • * 2 cups fresh basil leaves, packed
    • * 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
    • * 1/2 cup Olive oil
    • * 3 tablespoons pine nuts or walnuts
    • * 3 garlic cloves, finely minced

    Blend first 4 ingredients in processor to coarse puree. Transfer pesto to small bowl. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead.)

    Now… To Make The Pizza…

    Preheat oven to 500F. Grease 12 inch pizza pan with olive oil. Arrange dough in pan and spread all of pesto over dough.

    Sprinkle with sun?dried tomatoes…then your favorite cheeses.

    Occasionally I’ll add a sprinkle of Italian sausage for extra taste.

    Bake pizza until crust browns and cheese melts.

    Enjoy!

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    French Bread Pizza Recipe

    Posted by Lock On September - 18 - 2015 1 COMMENT

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    Spring is here and from time to time you may want to create a quick pizza that’s easy to make and also delicious. Here’s the answer. Using one of my favorite breads, French bread, we’re going to show you how to create a quick and easy pizza that all will love.

    Give it a shot!

    French Bread Pizza Recipe

    Ingredients:

    * 1/2 pound sausage, browned & drained
    * 1/2 pound sliced pepperoni
    * 1 loaf French bread
    * 30 ounces jar spaghetti or pizza sauce
    * Sliced black olives
    * Sliced fresh mushrooms
    * 16 ounces mozzarella cheese, shredded
    * Optional Toppings: Candied bacon, green peppers, onion, ground beef

    Directions:

    Cut bread in half lengthwise. Place on cookie sheets. Cover bread
    with the sauce all the way to the edges. Top with sausage and
    pepperoni; then with whatever toppings are desired, ending with
    the shredded cheese. Bake the bread pizzas 20 minutes at 350
    degrees. Cut into pieces. To freeze, wrap unbaked pizza tightly
    in foil. Then freeze. Unwrap and thaw the pizzas before baking.

    Once baked cut into manageable slices and serve. Everyone will love this creation at your next outdoor get together.

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    The Evolution Of Pizza – By Kirsten Hawkins

    Posted by Lock On September - 14 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

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    Trying to trace the history of the first pizza is a surprisingly controversial subject. Some claim that this popular food is based on early unleavened breads served in the early centuries in Rome. Others trace a connection from modern pizza back to the pita breads of Greece.
    Read the rest of this entry »

    Hawthorne Lane`s Pepperoni Pizza Recipe

    Posted by Lock On September - 12 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

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    A Monster Of A Pie!

    Ingredients:

    * 2 pc. Pizza dough (see below)
    * 1 teaspoon Virgin olive oil
    * 2 cups Whole milk mozzarella cheese, grated (loosely packed)
    * 1/2 cup Buffalo mozzarella, cubed into 1/2″ pieces (about 4 oz.)
    * 1 Red bell pepper, roasted, peeled and sliced into 1/4″ strips
    * 12 Kalamata olives
    * 2 tablespoons Grated Parmesan cheese
    * 2 ounces Gingrass Family Smoked Pepperoni, sliced very thinly (1/8″ or less)
    * 2 tablespoons Chopped Italian parsley

    Pizza Dough
    * 4 cups All purpose flour
    * 1 1/2 cup Warm water (about 90 F.)
    * 1 teaspoon Salt
    * 1 teaspoon Fresh yeast
    * 1 1/2 teaspoon Honey
    * 1 tablespoon Olive oil

    Directions:

    Pre-heat the oven to 500 F. and place a baking stone or tile in to heat.

    Roll the dough into roughly 10 ” rounds using a pie pin or by pounding and stretching the dough.

    Sprinkle a light cutting board or pizza peel with cornmeal or semolina and lay the dough down on it. Brush the olive oil over the center of the dough then spread the mozzarella cheese evenly over the dough, leaving a half-inch rim without cheese.

    Arrange the cubed buffalo mozzarella, the olives and the roasted peppers over the cheese. Finally, slide the pizzas into the oven.

    Bake for five minutes then remove from the oven and arrange the sliced pepperoni over the cheese and sprinkle the Parmesan over. Return to the over and continue to bake for five more minutes or until the edge of the crust becomes golden brown and the cheese bubbles in the center.

    Remove from the oven and place on a cutting board. Sprinkle the chopped Italian parsley over and cut into six or eight pieces. Serve immediately. Pizza Dough makes dough for six pizzas Combine the salt, flour and honey in an electric mixer and mix using the dough hook to distribute evenly.

    Add the water and yeast and mix for two minutes on low speed to bring the dough together. Increase the speed to medium and mix for six minutes, pushing the dough back into the mixing bowl if it creeps up the side. Add the olive oil and mix until the dough has absorbed to oil and comes back together. Turn out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead by hand to stiffen. Form into a ball and allow to rest for 30 minutes under a damp cloth. Scale into 4-1/2 oz. pieces then form into tight balls by rolling under your hand.

    The Potato Pizza Bake Recipe

    Posted by Lock On September - 6 - 2015 1 COMMENT

    Today we’re going to introduce you to something a bit different. We’re going to incorporate the beloved potato into a pizza recipe. I’m sure you’re going to love this.

    Before we get started, first a few words about the beloved potato.

    The history of the potato has its roots in the beautiful Andes Mountains of South America. It is an austere region that is marked by fluctuating temperatures and relatively poor soil conditions.

    It’s quite amazing that the tough and durable potato evolved in the thin air (elevations up to 15,000 feet) of this region. The potato is tough, just like like the people who first settled the region.

    The tough pre-Columbian farmers first discovered and cultivated the potato some 7,000 years ago. They were impressed by the ruggedness, storage quality and its nutritional value of the potato.

    Western man did not come in contact with the potato until as late as 1537 when the Conquistadors tramped through Peru. And it was even later, about 1570, that the first potato made its way across the Atlantic to make a start in the soil of Europe.

    Though the tuber was productive and hardy, the Spanish didn’t initially recognize these qualitites and put it to very limited use. In the Spanish Colonies potatoes were considered food for the underclasses; when brought to the Old World they would be used primarily to feed hospital inmates. Wow…the potato has surely evolved since those days.

    It would take three decades for the potato to spread to the rest of Europe. Even so the potato was cultivated primarily as a curiosity by amateur botanists. Resistance was due to ingrained eating habits. The potato’s popularity was somewhat hampered by it’s reputation as a food for the underprivileged and perhaps most importantly its relationship to poisonous plants.

    That was then, but this is now and I’m going to show you how we’re going to incorporate the beloved potato into a pizza dish that you can enjoy whenever you like.

    Let’s get started shall we…

    What you’re going to need…

    Ingredients:

    * 1 pound ground beef
    * 4 cups thinly sliced potatoes (or you can use potato halves)
    * 1 med. onion (sliced thin)
    * 1 can Cheddar cheese soup
    * 1 soup can milk
    * 1 (15 oz.) can tomato sauce
    * Salt and pepper to taste
    * 1/2 teaspoon oregano
    * 1/2 teaspoon sugar
    * 1 tablespoon butter
    * 6 ounces sliced mozzarella cheese
    * 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese

    Easy Directions:

    Preheat oven to 375 F. Cook ground beef in skillet until it loses redness. Place potatoes and onions in buttered 9×13″ pan. Add meat to mixture. Mix cheese soup and milk until smooth and add to meat and potatoes; mix together.

    Combine tomato sauce, salt, pepper, oregano and sugar. Pour sauce over the top, but do not mix. Dot with butter. Cover pan with foil. Bake at 375 F for 1 hour.

    Remove cover and arrange sliced cheese on top. Sprinkle with Parmesan. Return to oven, uncovered, for about 15 minutes or until cheese bubbles.

    There you have it, ni9ce and easy and more importantly super deliciuos. I hope you enjoy adding a pizza twist to one of our favorite foods… the potato.

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    Thin-Crusted Pizzas with Onions and Black Olives

    Posted by Lock On August - 29 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

    Thin Crust Pizza With Onions & Black Olives

    Are you a fan of thin crust pizza? Here’s a recipe that you don’t want to miss! This savory combination of black olives and onions will surely wake up your taste buds!

    Serves: 4 to 6

    Prep time: 45 minutes

    Grilling time: 15 to 20 minutes
    Dough

    1 envelope active dry yeast
    1?2 teaspoon granulated sugar
    3?4 cup warm water (105° to 115°F)
    2-1?2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for rolling dough
    Extra-virgin olive oil
    1 teaspoon kosher salt

    Sauce

    2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
    1?2 cup finely chopped red onion
    2 teaspoons minced garlic
    1 teaspoon dried oregano
    1 can (28 ounces) whole tomatoes
    1?2 teaspoon granulated sugar
    1?2 teaspoon kosher salt
    1?4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

    2 large red onions, cut crosswise into 1?3-inch slices
    Extra-virgin olive oil
    1?2 cup Mediterranean black olives, pitted and cut in half
    2 cups grated mozzarella cheese, about 8 ounces
    1–2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh Italian parsley

    1. In a medium bowl combine the yeast and sugar with the warm water. Stir once and let stand until foamy, 5 to 10 minutes. Add 2-1?2 cups of the flour, 3 tablespoons of olive oil, and the salt. Stir until the dough holds together. Transfer to a lightly floured work surface and knead until smooth, 4 to 6 minutes. Shape into a ball and place in a lightly oiled bowl. Turn the ball to cover the surface with oil. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set aside in a warm place until the dough doubles in size, 1 to 1-1?2 hours.

    2. In a medium saucepan over medium-high heat, warm the olive oil. Add the onion and cook until soft, about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and oregano, and cook until the garlic is light brown, about 1 minute, stirring occasionally. Add the tomatoes, including the juice. Use the back of a large spoon to crush the tomatoes. Season with the sugar, salt, and pepper. Bring the sauce to a boil, and then lower the heat to a simmer. Cook until you have 2 cups of sauce, 40 to 45 minutes, stirring occasionally. Let cool slightly and then purée in a food processor or blender. Allow to cool.

    3. Prepare the grill for direct cooking over medium heat (350° to 450°F).

    4. Brush the cooking grates clean. Brush the onion slices with oil. Grill over direct medium heat, with the lid closed as much as possible, until the onion is well marked, 10 to 12 minutes, turning once. Cut each slice in half.

    5. Punch down the dough in the bowl. Transfer to a lightly floured surface and cut into 4 equal pieces. Cut parchment paper into 9-inch squares and lightly oil each sheet of paper on one side. Roll or press the dough flat on the oiled side of the paper into circles about 8 inches in diameter, leaving the dough a little thicker at the edge than in the middle. Then lightly oil the top side of the dough. Lay the dough on the cooking grate, with the paper side facing up. Grab one corner of the paper with tongs and peel it off. Grill over direct medium heat until they are marked on the underside, 2 to 3 minutes, rotating the crusts occasionally for even cooking. Don’t worry if the crusts bubble; they will deflate when turned over. Transfer the crusts to the back of a baking sheet, with the grilled sides facing up.

    6. Spread about 1?2 cup of the sauce across each pizza crust, leaving a 1?2-inch border around the edges. Arrange the onions and olives over the sauce. Sprinkle the cheese on top. Transfer the pizzas from the baking sheet to the cooking grate. Grill until the crusts are crisp and the cheese is melted, 4 to 5 minutes, rotating the crusts occasionally for even cooking. Transfer to a cutting board. Garnish with parsley. Cut into wedges.

    Serve warm.

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