Saturday, November 28, 2015


Homemade Pizza Parlor – They'll Beg You To Make Another!


Today I’ve got a special video recipe that includes a special message… also it’s from a pretty special guy.

Stephen Pierce shares his “pizza burger” recipe and an important message regarding sucess. Stehpen is a highly recognized Internet marketing ‘guru”, life coach and super successful business person.

Stephen Pierce is one of the world’s leading internet marketing experts and speaks all over the world sharing his insights into how he and others make millions every year by leveraging the internet.

Check out his rendition of the famous “pizza burger”!

My Favorite Assorted Pizza Making Tips

Posted by Lock On October - 28 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

My Favorite Pizza Making Tips!

Less Sugar allows longer baking time

Speeding up the dough Process – More Yeast equals less preparation time…


450-465 degrees- normal crust

Thicker crust – 400-450 degrees…


Pizza bone – Edges of crust are over cooked….

Different methods of forming brings about different characteristics of the pizza crust.


Hand Tossing / Hand Stretching – Good volume and randam distribution of the gases in the dough will create a more cake type dough.

Sheeting – Will degas the dough (air makes the dough rise) This will create a thiner more cracker type crust…

Pressing – Heated roller pins will help redistribute the gases in the dough.

Crispier doughs are made by adding more water to the dough. Experiment with various amounts without lloosing h\the ability to handle the dough.

The extra moisture in the dough will allow heat to rise into the dough and create a heat barrier and cannot be passed into the sauce therefore the crust collects in the bottom of the dough thus making thedough bake crispier.

The softer your dough the crispier your crust will be however the more firm your dough the thicker your crust.
Line ingredients on the counter in the order of use.

It’s The Cheese That Makes Our Mouths Water!

Posted by Lock On October - 26 - 2015 1 COMMENT


Let’s face it, one of the favorite ingredients of any pizza is the cheese.  It’s that hot and stringy cheese that separates pizza from all other foods. The moment you pull that slice from the pie and the hot stringy cheese stretches unto your plate, we all get excited about “what’s next”.

Let’s take a moment to look a little closer at this wonderful an essential ingredient of our beloved pie.
Most pizzas are made with mozzarella cheese. Though this may vary from time to time, mozzarella cheese is by far the favorite when constructing a delicious pizza.

What is mozzarella cheese? Where exactly does it come from? How is it made? Have you ever asked yourself these questions?

Mozzarella cheese is a sliceable curd cheese originating in Italy. That’s probably not a surprise to you. Traditional mozzarella is made from water buffalo (Ok, before your eyes get big, not the North American buffalo or bison as many people mistakenly think) milk, and its flavor is highly prized. Water buffalo milk is three times more expensive than cow’s milk and is costly to ship, so expect a corresponding high price tag on imported buffalo mozzarella.

These animals are typically only herded in a few select countries, primarily Italy and Bulgaria.  Due to this, most mozzarella as we know it, is now made from cow’s milk. Water buffalo milk is very high in fat and in many cases is not easily digestible in its raw form. As such, it is used exclusively for making mozzarella and not as a beverage.

Mozzarella contains 40 to 45 percent fat, although there are now lower fat, skim versions available as we’ve seen them make their way into the “low fat” pizza market space.

This type of mozzarella cheese is not aged like most cheeses and is actually best when eaten within hours of its making. The process of making mozzarella is called pasta filata, which means the curds are heated in water or whey until they form strings (hence the term “string cheese”) and become elastic in texture. The curds are stretched, kneaded until smooth, and then formed into round balls to make fresh mozzarella cheese.

Different Mozzarella Cheese Types – Fresh Mozzarella Varieties

Mozzarella is not aged and is best when eaten within hours of its making.

Most people are quite familiar with mozzarella cheese. It is the cheese traditionally used on pizzas and to make fried cheese sticks. It’s important to note, there is quite a difference in flavor and texture between fresh mozzarella and processed sliced or shredded mozzarella, and it’s well worth your time to understand the differences.

It is easy to make homemade mozzarella cheese, and it can be used in a variety of recipes, including salads, meats, poultry, seafood, and vegetables.

Fresh Mozzarella Cheese

Fresh mozzarella cheese balls are sold in a brine, whey or water solution which helps them retain hydration and shape. It is smooth, mild, and slightly sweet/sour with a distinct milk flavor. The texture is creamy and much softer than mass-processed mozzarella cheese forms that are familiar to most. True buffalo mozzarella is much superior to any made with cow’s milk and is highly sought throughout the world.

Small balls (typically about one inch in diameter) of fresh mozzarella marinated in plain or herbed olive oil are called boconccini. Smoked mozzarella is known as mozzarella affumicata. Manteca is fresh mozzarella molded around a piece of butter.

Mozzarella rolls can be found with fillings of olives, prosciutto, Parma ham, sun-dried tomatoes, and any variety of herbs. The simplest and most enjoyable way to eat fresh mozzarella is with sliced fresh tomatoes, basil leaves, and a drizzle of olive oil. You’ll see this dish in a variety of forms served in many authentic Italian restaurants.

Fresh mozzarella is in high demand across America. It can typically be found in most common commercial grocery stores and in some Italian markets. It’s a good idea to keep fresh mozzarella in its liquid bath until ready to eat, and eat. This will usually last 2 to 3 days. If you choose to purchase fresh mozzarella you should always check the product dating and buy the freshest cheese that you can find. It’s preferable to purchase cheese made the same day. It’s also important to note, fresh mozzarella becomes bitter and sour with age. Freezing this type of cheese is also not recommended.

Processed Mozzarella Cheese

Contrary to fresh mozzarella, mass-produced mozzarella cheese is dryer, less flavorful, and has a rubbery texture. This bears little resemblance to its fresh counterpart. It’s quite a firm cheese that melts easily, which makes it best used as a binder for sauces, for melted toppings, and in baked dishes like our beloved pizza pies. Processed mozzarella cheese is easily attainable in part skim, low-fat, and non-fat versions. It’s typically packaged in pre-sliced or shredded assortments. It’s a good idea to keep processed mozzarella cheese tightly wrapped. It can usually be used within 2 to 4 weeks, if you want it to retain its full flavor.

The next time you sink your teeth into your favorite pizza pie, remember it’s the cheese that makes our eyes widen and lips smack. “Oh my”, pizza, what a wonderful and delightful treat.

Herb Pizza Dough Recipe

Posted by Lock On October - 24 - 2015 5 COMMENTS

Been looking for a great Herb Pizza dough recipe? Try this one, you’ll love it!
(Best when created with a bread machine)

* 1 package Active Dry Yeast
* 1 teaspoon Sugar
* 7/8 cup Warm Water — 110 degrees
* 1/4 cup Italian Seasoning
* 2 1/4 cups Flour
* 1 tablespoon Flour
* 1/2 teaspoon Salt
* 1 tablespoon Garlic Olive Oil — as needed
* Oil And Cornmeal For Pan

Stir together the yeast, sugar and warm water. Let stand until foamy, about 10
minutes. In the work bowl of a food processor fitted with the steel blade, chop
the herbs. Turn off machine. Add flour and salt.

Turn the machine on and off a couple of times. While the machine is running,
add yeast. Process until the dough forms a ball at the side of the bowl. Add garlic
olive oil and process for 30 to 40 seconds more.

Transfer dough to a bowl that has been oiled with olive oil. Turn the dough until
the entire surface has been coated with the oil. Cover bowl with a damp towel
and allow to rise in a warm draft free place for 1 hour or until doubled.

Roll out on a lightly floured surface and if dough is too elastic, try tossing it from
hand to hand to flatten it out. Lightly grease the pizza pan with a little oil and
sprinkle with cornmeal. Place the dough on the pizza pan and trim the edges.
Bake for 10 minutes @ 425 degrees.

Remove from oven, lightly brush the crust with a little more oil. Top as desired.

Makes enough dough for one 12″ crust.

Secrets Of Making Great Pizza At Home

Posted by Lock On October - 22 - 2015 5 COMMENTS

secretsOccasionally aspiring “pizza chefs” decide to create their favorite pizza pies at home. Firstly, the home pizza maker proceeds to gather all necessary ingredients for the highly anticipate pie. Once all ingredients are carefully arranged on the kitchen counter, the pizza maker prepares to commence the master pizza creation process.

Emphasis is placed on selecting the “perfect” blend of cheese and toppings. Also the precise blend of ingredients for the savory pizza sauce is selected. Typically, all eyes are on the pizza pie as it evolves in the kitchen. Once the pie has been carefully crafted, it is placed on a “pizza pan” and the master pizza baker slides the pie into the oven. Yes, into the oven it goes!

Some 7-12 minutes later, the pizza pie is removed from the oven. The master home pizza maker grabs the pizza cutter…. only to find that the crust is “doughy”, soggy, somewhat soft and certainly not representative of the great tasting pizza crust that you hoped to create. This is not the mouth watering pizza crust that you remember from the pizza parlor. What happened? Where did you go wrong?

If this sounds familiar, today is your lucky day because we’re going to take a look at the factors associated with this type of pizza phenomenon.  There are 3 main factors that we need to examine with respect to making great pizza at home with respect to the pizza crust you desire…

1-    Dough Selection & Proofing
2-    Oven Temperature
3-    Moisture content

Let’s take a closer look at the factors that contribute to these critical elements of creating the perfect pizza crust.
Selection of Dough:


Back in Italy when pizza makers select dough classification system. Flour is classified b way of numbers. 1, 0, or 00, this refers to how finely ground the flour is and how much of the bran and germ have been removed from the final flour product.

To give you a better understanding of this, 00 flour is the most highly refined flour available and is comparable to talcum-powder. Most Italian 00 flour is made from Italian grains and sometimes blends of Italian and imported grains to achieve a range of protein somewhere in the 10–12.5% range.

Lucky for us, common brands of 00 flour can be found at the retail level in standard U.S. grocery stores. One such flour is a brand called King Arthur Flour, the company produces a “clone” of the 00 flour (some call it Italian-Style flour) with a protein level of approximately 8.5% which is somewhat lower than the imported Italian 00 flours. Though it’s not exactly an authentic Italian flour and can produce varied behavioral characteristics, it’s a good flour for baking pizza at home.

This type of flour refers to flour with a protein level between 10-12%. All purpose flour is ideal for general baking purposes.

It’s important to note that higher protein flours make firmer, stronger doughs while lower protein flours produce softer, weaker doughs. Protein values differ as a cake flour is somewhere around 7-9% protein, whereas pastry, or cookies tend to hover around 9-10%. Bread typically yields 12.5-13.5% protein, whereas clear and high-gluten yield 14-15% protein and gluten “flour” (actually refined gluten) yields somewhere around 45%.

So why are we making such a “fuss” about flour type. Glad you asked! That leads me to another important factor with respect to making pizza crispy at home.

As defined by many baking experts, absorption is simply a measurement that was established by flour producers to describe the capacity of a particular flour to absorb water and achieve a specific and desired dough consistency. The value is often times expressed in terms of percent of water absorbed by a flour sample during the measurement test. The measurement is a laboratory measurement. This is important to keep in mind because this value is not identical to what’s called the hydration ratio actually achieved in commercial applications at pizza parlors, though it is usually quite close.

(Excerpt from The Secrets Of Making Home Pizza)
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Mushroom Turkey And Swiss Cheese Pizza

Posted by Lock On October - 20 - 2015 6 COMMENTS


What You’ll Need To Make Mushroom Turkey And Swiss Cheese Pizza Recipe Suggestion – Make your dough the night before you plan to bake your pizza, this will allow plenty of time for the dough to rise and also adds to the flavor of your crust)

Having problems making pizza dough? Take the pizza dough mini course… It’s FREE. You can find it here:
7 Secret Tips For Making Great Pizza Crust At Home

Read the rest of this entry »

History of Chicago Style Pizza

Posted by Lock On October - 18 - 2015 10 COMMENTS


The Chicago-style “deep-dish” pizza that many people love was invented at Pizzeria Uno, in Chicago, in 1943, reportedly by Uno’s founder Ike Sewell, a former University of Texas football star. However, a 1956 article from the Chicago Daily News asserts that Uno’s original pizza chef Rudy Malnati developed the famous recipe.

The pizza’s foundation is simple. It uses a thick layer of dough (made with olive oil and cornmeal) that is formed to a deep round pan and pulled up the sides. The pizza crust is then parbaked before the toppings are added to give it greater spring.

Parbaking is a cooking technique in which a bread or dough product is partially baked and then rapidly frozen or cooled. The raw dough is baked as if normal, but halted at about 80% of the normal cooking time, when it is rapidly cooled and frozen. The partial cooking kills the yeast in the bread mixture, and sets the internal structure of the proteins and starches (the spongy texture of the bread), so that it is now essentially cooked inside, but not so far as to have generated “crust” or other externally desirable qualities that are difficult to preserve once fully cooked.

Read the rest of this entry »

Eggplant, Pepper-Pesto & Goat Cheese Pizza

Posted by Lock On October - 16 - 2015 9 COMMENTS


This pizza is a preview from our upcoming HPC Premier Gourmet Collection to be released soon…

The pizza boasts tangy goat cheese, the sharp flavors of Parmesan, tender sautéed eggplant and bold pesto. This recipe creates a hearty fourteen-inch pizza that will have your pizza lovers begging for more.

Prep Time 10 Minutes
Cook Time – Approximately – 1 Hour
A little longer if making pizza dough if made from scratch
(of course I recommend you make it from scratch)

Pizza Ingredients:

7 1/2 tablespoons olive oil… a little more if needed
1 1/2 to 2 pound eggplant, cut into 1/4 inch slices
3/4 tablespoon salt
1 pound of prepared pizza dough
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 teaspoon fresh-ground black pepper (I use a tad bit more)
6 ounces mild goat cheese, such as Montrachet, cut into 1/4 inch slices
1/2 cup grated fresh Parmesan
1/2 cup of pesto (preferably homemade)

Quick Homemade Pizza Dough:

Making The Pizza Dough…


* 3 1/4 cups unbleached flour
* 2 teaspoons salt
* 1 cup warm water
* 1 envelope active dry yeast
* 3 tablespoons olive oil


In a bowl, combine the flour and salt, and mix thoroughly. In a separate stainless steel bowl, combine the water and yeast, and using a whisk, add 2 tablespoons of oil. Let rest for 5 minutes. Pour the water into the center of the flour, and with a spatula, stir to combine well into a sticky mass. Pour this mass out onto a lightly floured surface and begin to knead the dough by working the dough with the heel of the palm of your hand.

Push outward and pull the inside edge over the top. Repeat the process over again to create a smooth ball of dough free of stickiness. Place the ball of dough into a clean stainless steel bowl that has been brushed with the remaining 1 tablespoon of olive oil.

Cover with a clean cloth and let rise at room temperature for 1 1/2 hours or until it has doubled in size. When the dough has risen it can be rolled into a ball, which will later be patted into the traditional pizza shape.

Directions For Eggplant Topping:

Heat the oven to 450 degrees. In a large nonstick frying pan, heat 2 1/2 tablespoons of the olive oil over moderately high heat. Season the eggplant with the salt. We’re going to address the eggplant one batch at a time until it’s all handled. Fry one-third of the eggplant, turning until the eggplant has become golden (usually takes about 10 minutes). Remove the eggplant.

Repeat in two more batches with the remaining oil (using more if needed), until you’ve addresses the entire amount of eggplant.

Meanwhile, oil a 14 inch pizza pan or a large baking sheet. Roll and press the pizza dough onto the pan in an approximately 14-inch circle or you can use a 9-by-13 inch the eggplant slices on the pizza crust layer.
Sprinkle the garlic and pepper over the top of the pie. Bake for approximately 12 minutes. After approximately 12 minutes, put the goat cheese slices on the pizza and sprinkle with the Parmesan, then dot evenly with pesto.
Bake until the cheese begins to turn golden (about 15 minutes).
Note: Sauvignon blanc is a remarkably versatile wine, and really goes well with goat cheese and basil. If you would like to view a very nice selection of wines visit our friends at

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Before we make today’s pizza let’s first talk a bit about Fontina Cheese…

Fontina is a cow’s milk Italian cheese of sorts. Fontina cheese has a rich historical background and has been made in the Aosta Valley, in the Alps since the 12th century.

The milk fat content of this type of cheese is around 45%. As with many original varieties, the name “Fontina” has been imposed upon by such derivatives as “Fontinella”, “Fontal”, and “Fontella”.

Italian Fontina can be identified by a Consorzio (Consortium) stamp of the Matterhorn including the script “FONTINA”. Although the version from Aosta is the original and the most famous, Fontina production occurs in other parts of Italy, as well as Denmark, Sweden and France.

The original Fontina cheese from Italy is fairly pungent and has quite an intense flavor, although cheeses labeled Fontina that are produced in other countries tend to be much milder without the profound flavor associated with the distinct original Fontina intensity.

Let’s try our hand at a unique pizza with a flavor that you’re sure to remember.

Pizza With Fontina Cheese, Artichoke Hearts And Red Onions


* 1 pound Frozen white bread dough; thawed according to package directions
* 2 tablespoons Olive oil; divided
* 2 tablespoons Wheat bran or cornmeal
* 1 clove garlic; chopped finely
* 1/2 medium Red onion; thinly sliced
* 1 package (9 oz. size) frozen artichokes; thawed
* Salt
* Freshly ground black pepper
* 1 cup shredded Fontina cheese

Drain and slice artichoke hearts. Preheat oven to 450F. On lightly oiled baking
sheet, press chilled dough into 9 x 12 inch rectangle, crimp edges to form a rim.
Brush with half the oil. Evenly sprinkle with bran or cornmeal; press lightly into
dough. Sprinkle with garlic. Arrange onion in 1 layer over dough; top with
artichoke hearts. Drizzle with remaining oil.

Lightly season with salt and pepper. Evenly sprinkle with cheese. Do not let
dough rise. The pizza may be held briefly in the refrigerator before baking. Bake
15 minutes or until crust is golden brown.

Cut into manageable slices and enjoy!

Gourmet Grocery Online

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How To Grill Your Favorite Pizza!

Posted by Lock On October - 10 - 2015 2 COMMENTS

America’s favorite food has long been the pizza cooked in a traditional oven but is that about to change? While most Americans have probably never indulged in a grilled pizza, the origins of pizza are making a big comeback. There is no denying that we love our traditional backyard barbeque but rarely, if ever has the barbeque included grilling a pizza. Despite the seemingly odd combination of grill and pizza, the grill is the ideal tool for cooking pizza and in fact is deep in the origin of pizza making. The high, dry heat is ideal for a nice crisp crust and the flavor provided from your grill will on a whole new world of backyard grilling.Before the word pizza was ever used, Greeks and Romans used wood-fired brick ovens to prepare the original version of pizza – flatbread. In ancient times each diner was given a piece of flat bread along with a piece of meat on the bread. This food was eaten with the fingers with an occasional knife to cut the meat. Little did they know that this would eventually spark the creation one of the America’s favorite foods.

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    Great Mediterranean Pita Pizza Recipe

    Posted by Lock On October - 8 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

    * 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    * 1 medium onion, finely minced
    * 1/2 green bell pepper, small dice
    * 1 pound ground lamb (or turkey or chicken)
    * 1 teaspoon cumin
    * 1 teaspoon coriander
    * 4 sprigs fresh oregano
    * OR
    * 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
    * Salt and pepper
    * 2 tablespoons tomato paste
    * Water (optional)
    * 4 large fresh pita
    * 1/4 cup grated Parmesan
    * 4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled
    * 2 Roma tomatoes, seeds removed, small dice
    * 1/4 cup kalamata olives, roughly chopped
    * Olive oil (optional)
    * Fresh torn basil (optional)



    Preheat oven to 500F. (Note: If pita is fairly sturdy, place assembled pizzas
    directly on rack. If not, preheat a baking sheet with the oven.)
    In a large sauté pan, preheat oil and pan over medium flame. Add onions and
    peppers and sweet for about five minutes to soften.
    Add ground meat and more oil if necessary to prevent sticking. As meat browns,
    break up with a wooden spoon to combine with veggies and brown evenly

    Butternut Squash, Bacon, And Rosemary Pizza Recipe

    Posted by Lock On October - 6 - 2015 1 COMMENT


    Butternut squash is also known in Australia as Butternut pumpkin, is a type of winter squash that is absolutely delicious.  It has a distinct sweet and nutty taste that is similar to that of pumpkin.  This type of yellow skin squash also boasts an orange fleshy pulp. When ripe, it turns increasingly deep orange, and becomes sweeter and richer.

    The most popular variety, the Waltham Butternut, originated in Stow, Massachusetts, on what is now the Butternut Farm Golf Club. This makes a very unique ingredient for our next pizza creation which I’m sure you’ll absolutely love!


    * 1 1/2 pound butternut squash

    * 1 tablespoon vegetable oil

    * 1/2 cup water

    * 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and kept warm

    * 10 sheets phyllo stacked between sheets of wax paper and covered with a kitchen towel

    * 9 tablespoons parmesan cheese — freshly grated

    * 6 slices bacon cut into 1/2-inch pieces, cooked until crisp, and drained

    * 1 tablespoon fresh rosemary leaves — minced

    * 6 scallion greens — chopped

    * 1 small red onion sliced thin and separated into pieces


    Quarter squash lengthwise and discard seeds. Peel squash carefully and cut into 3/4-inch pieces. In a large heavy skillet cook squash in oil over moderate heat, stirring occasionally, 2 minutes. Add water and salt to taste and simmer, covered, until squash is just tender, about 10 minutes. Simmer squash, uncovered, until almost all water is evaporated, about 5 minutes. In a food processor purée squash with salt and pepper to taste. Squash purée may be made 1 day ahead and chilled, covered.

    Preheat oven to 400°F.

    Lightly brush a large baking sheet with some butter and put 1 sheet phyllo on butter. Lightly brush phyllo with some remaining butter and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon Parmesan. Put another sheet of phyllo over cheese, pressing it firmly so that it adheres to bottom layer. Butter, sprinkle with cheese, and layer remaining phyllo in the same manner, ending with a sheet of phyllo. Lightly brush top sheet with remaining butter. Fold in all sides 1/4 inch, pressing to top sheet, and fold up a 1/4-inch border, crimping corners.

    Spread squash purée evenly on phyllo crust and top with bacon, rosemary, scallion greens, and onion.

    Bake pizza in middle of oven until crust is golden, about 15 minutes.

    Pizza – It’s Simply An American Favorite

    Posted by Lock On October - 4 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS


    Few American foods are loved more than the infamous “pizza pie”. It doesn’t matter if you’re young, old or somewhere in between, almost everyone has a favorite when it comes to pizza. It would be rare to find someone that has never tried a slice of pizza.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Perfect Pesto Pizza Recipe

    Posted by Lock On October - 2 - 2015 1 COMMENT

    Today’s pizza is an Italian Favorite. It goes to the very heart of great Italian cooking. If you enjoy pesto you’ll love this pizza pie.

    “Pesto” the name itself comes from the Latin root “pestle,” which is typically fitting as the sauce, in its simplest form, its made by crushing a few key savory ingredients together. There are two forms of pesto sauce that are commonly used… pesto alla genovese and pesto alla siciliana. Both forms of pesto sauce are from Genoa and Sicily, respectively.

    Pesto alla genoese is made with garlic, salt, extra virgin olive oil, Pecorino Sardo cheese, and Genoese basil.  (Note that Genoese basil is just one member of the large basil family.) The recipe for pesto alla siciliana is similar, but with tomatoes and less basil. Most accept the fact that the Genoese recipe for pesto, was the original recipe.

    Pesto  sauces are typically made with a veriety of different ingredients and have been part of Italian cuisines since Roman times. In addition to the well known two basic pesto recipes, other variations include red bell peppers,  sun dried tomatoes, pine nuts, walnuts, parmesan cheese, and ricotta cheese. In fact, some pesto sauces are made with arugula instead of basil.

    Pesto is a very versatile sauce and can be used as a bruschetta topping, on pasta, on cooked meats, and even in soups. Of course today we’ll be using pesto sauce for our pizza. A lovely way to explore pesto sauces is to buy a few different kinds, and make a platter of pesto bruschetta using each sauce… then decide which sauce suits your fancy for your favorite pizza pie.

    By the way, most basil plants grow year after year and will increase in size if they are planted in nourishing soil.

    While the herb is delicious to eat fresh from the bush in salads or as a pasta topping, it can also be used delightfully in the form of a pesto sauce as you’ll see today.

    HomePizzaChef’s Premier Pesto Pizza

    • 1 1/2 cups (packed) stemmed spinach leaves
    • 1/2 cup (packed) fresh basil leaves (about 1 bunch)
    • 1 1/2 tablespoons oil from oil?packed sun?dried tomatoes or olive oil
    • 1 large garlic clove
    • Olive Oil (of course…)
    • Your favorite thin pizza crust recipe (see many crust recipes on this site)
    • 1/3 cup sliced drained oil?packed sun?dried tomatoes
    • 2 cups grated mozzarella cheese (about 8 ounces)
    • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese

    Alternative Pesto Recipe

    • * 2 cups fresh basil leaves, packed
    • * 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
    • * 1/2 cup Olive oil
    • * 3 tablespoons pine nuts or walnuts
    • * 3 garlic cloves, finely minced

    Blend first 4 ingredients in processor to coarse puree. Transfer pesto to small bowl. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead.)

    Now… To Make The Pizza…

    Preheat oven to 500F. Grease 12 inch pizza pan with olive oil. Arrange dough in pan and spread all of pesto over dough.

    Sprinkle with sun?dried tomatoes…then your favorite cheeses.

    Occasionally I’ll add a sprinkle of Italian sausage for extra taste.

    Bake pizza until crust browns and cheese melts.


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    Three-Cheese Pizza With Mushrooms and Basil

    Posted by Lock On September - 28 - 2015 1 COMMENT


    Here in Tennessee it was 75 degrees, then a
    few days later…35 degrees and today it’s warm again…

    The weather is complicated… my goodness!

    Well… today I’ve got a great pizza recipe for you that
    combines simplicity with flavor that’s tremendously
    boastful… it’s one of my favorites and I’m sure it will
    become one of your favorites also… an it’s NOT
    complicated at all…

    This recipe uses “basil”, one of the most important culinary herbs used in salads, casseroles, sauces and even some liqueurs …

    We’ll combine this ingredient with three distinct cheeses that will have your pizza pie bursting with flavor…

    Let me introduce you to the….
    Three-Cheese Pizza With Mushrooms and Basil

    We’ll be using parmesan cheese, skim ricotta cheese and skim mozzarella cheese for those of you who enjoy
    the flavor of a lighter cheese blend…

    Here’s the recipe

    Three-Cheese Pizza With Mushrooms and Basil


    * Cooking spray
    * 1 (8-ounce) package pre-sliced mushrooms
    * 1/2 cup part-skim ricotta cheese
    * 1/4 cup shredded fresh Parmesan cheese
    * 1 (10-ounce) Italian cheese-flavored pizza crust
    (you can use Boboli or traditional for this one))
    * 1 cup chunky vegetable pasta sauce
    * 1/2 cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese
    * 2 tablespoons thinly-sliced fresh basil

    Preheat oven to 450 degrees.

    Heat a large nonstick skillet coated with cooking spray over medium-high heat.

    Add mushrooms; sauté 5 minutes. Remove from heat.

    Combine ricotta and Parmesan cheeses.

    Place pizza crust on a baking sheet. (you can use the crust recipe found in the HomePizzaChef Crust Tutorial for this one also)…

    Spread pasta sauce over crust, leaving a 1-inch border.

    Dollop the ricotta cheese mixture evenly over sauce and top with mushrooms.

    Sprinkle with mozzarella…

    Bake 12 minutes or until crust is crisp. Sprinkle with basil; cut into wedges.

    Serve and watch your family and friends beg you to make another!

    Truffle Pizza Recipe

    Posted by Lock On September - 24 - 2015 2 COMMENTS


    Today we’re going o try something a little different. A unique pizza recipe that sure to tinglr your taste buds and delight your pizza loving friends and family.

    We’ll be using truffle opil in the recipe. This is an ingredient that adds unique flavor and aroma to the traditional pizza taste.

    Truffle oil is a modern culinary ingredient added to many foods, which is intended to impart the flavor and aroma of truffles to a wide variety of dishes. Most people are unaware that truffle oils are not, in fact, made from actual truffles, but are instead a synthetic product that combines a thioether (2,4-dithiapentane), one of numerous organic aromatics odorants found in real truffles, with an olive oil base. A few more expensive oils are alleged to be made from truffles or the by-products of truffle harvesting and production, though the flavor of truffles is difficult to capture in an oil.

    Truffle Pizza Recipe

    * 1 tablespoon Yeast
    * 1 cup Warm water (110 degrees)
    * 1/4 cup Olive oil
    * 3 1/2 cups Flour
    * 2 teaspoons Salt
    * 1 pound New potatoes; thinly sliced, blanched
    * 1 cup Julienned red onions
    * 2 tablespoons Extra-virgin olive oil
    * Salt; to taste
    * Freshly ground white pepper; to taste
    * 1/2 cup Grated Parmigiano-Regginao cheese
    * 1 Drizzle truffle oil
    * 2 tablespoons Chopped chives


    Preheat the oven 400 degrees. In an electric mixer, whisk the yeast, water, and oil, together, to form a taste. Using a dough hook, add the flour and salt to the paste, mix the dough until the dough comes away from the sides and crawls up the sides of the hook. Remove the dough from the bowl and turn the dough into a greased bowl, cover. Let the dough rise until double in size, about 1 hour.

    Turn the dough out onto a floured surface and divide into four 4-ounce balls, cover. Let the dough rest for 10 to 15 minutes. Press each dough out into a 10-inch circle about 1/2 – to 1-inch thick. Lightly brush the dough with olive oil.

    Divide the potatoes into four portions and season with salt and pepper. Cover each dough with the potatoes, leaving a 1-inch border. In a small mixing bowl, toss the red onions with the extra-virgin olive oil.

    Season with salt and pepper. Place a layer of the red onions on top of the potatoes. Sprinkle each pizza with the grated cheese. Drizzle each pizza with the truffle oil. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes or until the crust is crispy and golden-brown. Garnish the pizza with chives.

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