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HomePizzaChef

Homemade Pizza Parlor – They'll Beg You To Make Another!

My Favorite Assorted Pizza Making Tips

Posted by Lock On October - 28 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

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My Favorite Pizza Making Tips!

Less Sugar allows longer baking time

Speeding up the dough Process – More Yeast equals less preparation time…

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450-465 degrees- normal crust

Thicker crust – 400-450 degrees…

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Pizza bone – Edges of crust are over cooked….
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Different methods of forming brings about different characteristics of the pizza crust.

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Hand Tossing / Hand Stretching – Good volume and randam distribution of the gases in the dough will create a more cake type dough.

Sheeting – Will degas the dough (air makes the dough rise) This will create a thiner more cracker type crust…

Pressing – Heated roller pins will help redistribute the gases in the dough.
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Crispier doughs are made by adding more water to the dough. Experiment with various amounts without lloosing h\the ability to handle the dough.

The extra moisture in the dough will allow heat to rise into the dough and create a heat barrier and cannot be passed into the sauce therefore the crust collects in the bottom of the dough thus making thedough bake crispier.
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The softer your dough the crispier your crust will be however the more firm your dough the thicker your crust.
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Line ingredients on the counter in the order of use.
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Secrets Of Making Great Pizza At Home

Posted by Lock On October - 22 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

secretsOccasionally aspiring “pizza chefs” decide to create their favorite pizza pies at home. Firstly, the home pizza maker proceeds to gather all necessary ingredients for the highly anticipate pie. Once all ingredients are carefully arranged on the kitchen counter, the pizza maker prepares to commence the master pizza creation process.

Emphasis is placed on selecting the “perfect” blend of cheese and toppings. Also the precise blend of ingredients for the savory pizza sauce is selected. Typically, all eyes are on the pizza pie as it evolves in the kitchen. Once the pie has been carefully crafted, it is placed on a “pizza pan” and the master pizza baker slides the pie into the oven. Yes, into the oven it goes!

Some 7-12 minutes later, the pizza pie is removed from the oven. The master home pizza maker grabs the pizza cutter…. only to find that the crust is “doughy”, soggy, somewhat soft and certainly not representative of the great tasting pizza crust that you hoped to create. This is not the mouth watering pizza crust that you remember from the pizza parlor. What happened? Where did you go wrong?

If this sounds familiar, today is your lucky day because we’re going to take a look at the factors associated with this type of pizza phenomenon.  There are 3 main factors that we need to examine with respect to making great pizza at home with respect to the pizza crust you desire…

1-    Dough Selection & Proofing
2-    Oven Temperature
3-    Moisture content

Let’s take a closer look at the factors that contribute to these critical elements of creating the perfect pizza crust.
Selection of Dough:

Background:

Back in Italy when pizza makers select dough classification system. Flour is classified b way of numbers. 1, 0, or 00, this refers to how finely ground the flour is and how much of the bran and germ have been removed from the final flour product.

To give you a better understanding of this, 00 flour is the most highly refined flour available and is comparable to talcum-powder. Most Italian 00 flour is made from Italian grains and sometimes blends of Italian and imported grains to achieve a range of protein somewhere in the 10–12.5% range.

Lucky for us, common brands of 00 flour can be found at the retail level in standard U.S. grocery stores. One such flour is a brand called King Arthur Flour, the company produces a “clone” of the 00 flour (some call it Italian-Style flour) with a protein level of approximately 8.5% which is somewhat lower than the imported Italian 00 flours. Though it’s not exactly an authentic Italian flour and can produce varied behavioral characteristics, it’s a good flour for baking pizza at home.

ALL-PURPOSE FLOUR:
This type of flour refers to flour with a protein level between 10-12%. All purpose flour is ideal for general baking purposes.

It’s important to note that higher protein flours make firmer, stronger doughs while lower protein flours produce softer, weaker doughs. Protein values differ as a cake flour is somewhere around 7-9% protein, whereas pastry, or cookies tend to hover around 9-10%. Bread typically yields 12.5-13.5% protein, whereas clear and high-gluten yield 14-15% protein and gluten “flour” (actually refined gluten) yields somewhere around 45%.

So why are we making such a “fuss” about flour type. Glad you asked! That leads me to another important factor with respect to making pizza crispy at home.

ABSORPTION:
As defined by many baking experts, absorption is simply a measurement that was established by flour producers to describe the capacity of a particular flour to absorb water and achieve a specific and desired dough consistency. The value is often times expressed in terms of percent of water absorbed by a flour sample during the measurement test. The measurement is a laboratory measurement. This is important to keep in mind because this value is not identical to what’s called the hydration ratio actually achieved in commercial applications at pizza parlors, though it is usually quite close.

(Excerpt from The Secrets Of Making Home Pizza)
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Great Home Pizza

This article was produced by HomepizzaChef.com. Grab a Free Home Pizza Making Guide
HERE

The LAST thing you need is a homemade pizza that just doesn’t cut it when you’re entertaining guest or simply making pizza at home for family and friends.

There are 3 main factors (Deadly Sins) that need to be examined with respect to making great pizza at home… especially if you want a great tasting crust. Let’s examine these key elements of home pizza making to insure that your next homemade pizza pie is certainly a success.

1-Dough Selection

2-Oven Temperature

3-Moisture Content

Let’s take a look at these specific factors and how they can contribute to the overall make up of your final pizza masterpiece.

Selection of Dough

Back in Italy when pizza makers select dough, there is a classification system.  Flour is classified by way of numbers. 1,0, or 00, refers to how finely ground the flour is and how much of bran and germ have been removed from the final flour product.

To paint a clearer picture of how this works… “00” flour is the most highly refined flour available and is comparable to talcum-powder.  Most Italian  “ 00” flour is made from Italian grains and sometimes blends of Italian and imported grains to achieve a range of protein somewhere in the 10-12.5% range.

Lucky for us, common brands of 00 flour can be found at the retail level in standard U.S. grocery stores. Several companies produces a close “clone” of the 00 flour (some call it Italian 00 flour) with a protein level of approximately 8.5% which is somewhat lower than the imported Italian 00 flours.

Though it’s not exactly the authentic Italian flour it usually produces good results even though you can expect slight variations from time to time.

This type of flour continues to be very good flour for baking pizza at home.
All Purpose Flour:

This type of flour refers to flour with a protein level between 10-12%.  All purpose flour is ideal for general purpose baking.  Prepared correctly, it can also be used effectively for making good pizza crust.

It’s important to note that higher protein flours make stronger, firmer doughs while lower protein flours produce softer weaker doughs. Protein values differ however as cake flour is somewhere around 7-9% protein. Pastry and cookies tend to be in the neighborhood of 9-10%.

Bread usually yields approximately 12.5-13.5% protein, whereas clear and high gluten yield 14-15% protein and gluten “flour” (the actual refined gluten) yields approximately 45% protein.

Absorption:

I know… I know… we seem to be making a big deal about flour types… well here’s why…

Absorption as defined by many baking experts is simply a measurement that was established by flour producers to describe the capacity of a particular flour to absorb water and achieve a specific and desired dough consistency.

The value is typically expressed in terms of percent of water absorbed by a flour sampling during the measurement test. Of course these are laboratory measurements so this value is not identical to what is termed “hydration ratio” which is actually achieved in commercial applications at pizza parlors, restaurants and the like. Absorption however is still quite close for measuring this process.

Though there are several additional factors to consider, since our focus is on flour for home pizza making there is one more critical element to consider…

Oven Temperature:

It’s important to understand that most home pizza maestro’s are typically using conventional ovens to bake their masterpieces. This is a major consideration considering the fact that we tend to compare our homemade creation to those we purchase at the pizza parlor.

In light of this one simple fact, we need to make sure we have accommodated for the distinct difference in temperature due to our use of standard conventional ovens.  Because of the “temperature factor”, we need for things to happen quickly when we slide that great pizza pie into the oven. We don’t want lots of moisture content in our pizza crust so here’s  a few things we need to do.

1- Never place your home made pizza creation in a cold oven (thinking… it will warm up as it cooks…).

2 – Use a pizza stone to insure that the surface on which the pizza rest is very hot, therefore absorbing moisture much quicker than if the pizza were setting atop a pizza pan.

Keep in mind that most home ovens measure temperature based upon the “air temperature” inside the oven. Though this is good for most baking, we really want to concentrate on how hot the temperature is where the pizza meets the stone.

So there we have it. Three deadly mistakes to avoid like the plague when you’re creating a home pizza masterpiece!

This article was produced by  HomepizzaChef.com. Grab a Free Home Pizza Making Guide HERE

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How To Grill Your Favorite Pizza!

Posted by Lock On October - 10 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

America’s favorite food has long been the pizza cooked in a traditional oven but is that about to change? While most Americans have probably never indulged in a grilled pizza, the origins of pizza are making a big comeback. There is no denying that we love our traditional backyard barbeque but rarely, if ever has the barbeque included grilling a pizza. Despite the seemingly odd combination of grill and pizza, the grill is the ideal tool for cooking pizza and in fact is deep in the origin of pizza making. The high, dry heat is ideal for a nice crisp crust and the flavor provided from your grill will on a whole new world of backyard grilling.Before the word pizza was ever used, Greeks and Romans used wood-fired brick ovens to prepare the original version of pizza – flatbread. In ancient times each diner was given a piece of flat bread along with a piece of meat on the bread. This food was eaten with the fingers with an occasional knife to cut the meat. Little did they know that this would eventually spark the creation one of the America’s favorite foods.

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    Pizza – It’s Simply An American Favorite

    Posted by Lock On October - 4 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

      250x250HPC

    Few American foods are loved more than the infamous “pizza pie”. It doesn’t matter if you’re young, old or somewhere in between, almost everyone has a favorite when it comes to pizza. It would be rare to find someone that has never tried a slice of pizza.

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Monthly Pizza Club

    Posted by Lock On September - 26 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

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    The Gourmet Pizza Club
    invites you to join with other pizza lovers to enjoy mouth watering and taste-tempting specialty pizzas. Explore succulent selections such as the rich and spicy flavor of our Italian Beef Pizza to the bold and exotic taste of our shrimp Teriyaki Pizza.

    With each Pizza of the Month Club shipment you’ll receive one (1) deep dish and two (2) thin crust specialty pizzas. That’s three big 12″ Italian works of art every month. We’ll deliver them frozen fresh to your home or office in a reusable Styrofoam cooler. For more information visit:
    http://www.homepizzachef.com/pizzaplus.htm

    Achieving A Crispy Pizza Crust

    Posted by Lock On September - 2 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

    dough
    Occasionally aspiring “pizza chefs” decide to create their favorite pizza pies at home. Firstly, the home pizza maker proceeds to gather all necessary ingredients for the highly anticipate pie. Once all ingredients are carefully arranged on the kitchen counter, the pizza maker prepares to commence the master pizza creation process.

    Emphasis is placed on selecting the “perfect” blend of cheese and toppings. Also the precise blend of ingredients for the savory pizza sauce is selected. Typically, all eyes are on the pizza pie as it evolves in the kitchen. Once the pie has been carefully crafted, it is placed on a “pizza pan” and the master pizza baker slides the pie into the oven. Yes, into the oven it goes!

    Some 7-12 minutes later, the pizza pie is removed from the oven. The master home pizza maker grabs the pizza cutter…. only to find that the crust is “doughy”, soggy, somewhat soft and certainly not representative of the crispy crust that you hoped to create. This is not the crunchy crust that you remember from the pizza parlor. What happened? Where did I go wrong?

    If this sounds familiar, today is your lucky day because I’m going to solve this problem for you with two simple words.
    Read the rest of this entry »

    Apple_oatmeal_pizza

     

    The infamous pizza pie continues to be one of the most beloved foods in the world, especially in the United States. As the baby boomer generation continues to dictate a wide variety of trends inside and outside of the food and beverage sectors, new and alternative ideas are beginning to emerge to move pizza closer to healthier and more exciting recipes that this sector of society craves.

    The way pizza is served, cooked and eaten is also evolving. Many people are experimenting with new ways of enjoying their favorite pizza pies without the gluten content found in traditional pizza crusts. Some examples of these types of gluten free products include tapioca flour, corn flour, white rice flour and corn meal.
    Read the rest of this entry »

    Yeast Free Pizza Dough

    Posted by Lock On August - 19 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

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    Yeast-Free Pizza Dough

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    Tomatoes – The Worlds Most Popular Fruit

    Posted by Lock On August - 5 - 2015 2 COMMENTS

     

    Tomatoes – The Worlds Most Popular Fruittomato1

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Surprisingly, the tomato is the world’s most popular fruit. And yes, just like the brinjal and the pumpkin, botanically speaking it is a fruit, not a vegetable. More than 60 million tons of tomatoes are produced per year, 16 million tons more than the second most popular fruit, the banana. Apples are the third most popular (36 million tons), then oranges (34 million tons) and watermelons (22 million tons).

    Tomatoes were first cultivated in 700 AD by Aztecs and Incas. Explorers returning from Mexico introduced the tomato into Europe, where it was first mentioned in 1556. The French called it “the apple of love,” the Germans “the apple of paradise.”

    Tomatoes are rich in vitamins A and C and fiber, and are cholesterol free. An average size tomato (148 gram, or 5 oz) boasts only 35 calories. Furthermore, new medical research suggests that the consumption of lycopene – the stuff that makes tomatoes red – may prevent cancer. Lycopene is part of the family of pigments called carotenoids, which are natural compounds that create the colours of fruits and vegetables. For example, beta carotene is the orange pigment in carrots. As with essential amino acids, they are not produced by the human body. Lycopene us the most powerful antioxidant in the carotenoid family and, with vitamins C and E, protect us from the free radicals that degrade many parts of the body.

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    Tomato Tips

    Posted by Lock On July - 19 - 2015 2 COMMENTS

    Peeling: There are several ways to peel a tomato: Cut an X at the blossom end (opposite the stem).

    tomatoes09Dip in boiling water for 10 to 30 seconds, depending on ripeness, then into ice water. The skin will pull off easily. Spear a tomato with a fork and hold it over the flame of a gas burner, turning often until the skin is blistered. Remove skin.
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    Bread Machine Cornmeal Pizza Crust Recipe

    Posted by Lock On June - 27 - 2015 ADD COMMENTS

    bp_pic4a
    Bread Machine Cornmeal Pizza Crust Recipe


    Ingredients:* 1-cup warm water
    * 1/4 teaspoon salt — optional
    * 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour — divided
    * 1-cup cornmeal — plus
    * 1-tablespoon cornmeal — divided
    * 2 tablespoons sugar or honey
    * 2 teaspoons active dry yeast


    Directions:

    Measure carefully, placing all ingredients except 1-tablespoon cornmeal in bread machine pan in order specified by owner’s manual. Program basic dough cycle setting; press start. Remove dough from bread machine pan; let rest 2 to 3 minutes
     

    Pat and gently stretch dough into 14- to 15-inch circle. Spray a 14-inch pizza pan with nonstick cooking spray; sprinkle with remaining 1-tablespoon cornmeal.Press dough into pan.Follow topping and baking directions for individual recipes. 1 14-inch crust makes 8 servings.

    Favorite World-Wide Pizza Toppings

    Posted by Lock On November - 18 - 2014 ADD COMMENTS

    earth

    Around the world, pizza toppings vary greatly; reflecting regional tastes, indigenous foods and cultural preferences. Pizza remains a favorite dish regardless of geographical location.
    Read the rest of this entry »